Can’t Get To The Beach? Go Up On The Roof.

Can’t Get To The Beach? Go Up On The Roof.

By Regina Cole | Forbes

Socceroof in Brooklyn has ten soccer fields, a high-end sports bar, multiple big-screen TVs and spectacular, unobstructed panoramic waterfront views of Manhattan. It’s atop the Whale, a cluster of three former industrial buildings in Sunset Park. Built in 1918 by E.W. Bliss Projectile Works, the Whale Building complex originally served as a waterfront torpedo assembly factory. Later, the building served as the headquarters of the Whale Oil Company; ever since, it has been known as the Whale Building. With a $25+ million investment in building upgrades, Madison Realty Capital is bringing modern amenities and creative energy to this historic building, with 500,000 square feet of space on seven stories that feature 14 to 20-foot ceilings. There is even on-site parking.

New development activity is making land and outdoor space in New York scarcer than ever; it would be difficult to establish ten soccer fields anywhere on the ground. Today’s developers are integrating terraces and rooftop spaces to attract and retain tenants. Historically considered a luxury in residential towers and lifestyle venues, building owners are increasingly using these assets to provide occupants with more options. The roof has become the place where museums like to site bars, as exemplified by the Metropolitan Museum’s popular Cantor Rooftop Garden Bar.

At 3 World Trade Center, the second tallest building in the World Trade Center complex and the fifth tallest building in New York City, there are terraces on floors 17, 60 and 76. At 935 feet above street level, the 76th floor terrace is the tallest outdoor office terrace in Manhattan. The 17th floor terrace, which is 205 feet above street level, is designed by Ken Smith Workshop. Building tenants will have 5,500-square feet of outdoor, fully-landscaped space with a lush garden environment for a variety of social gatherings.

When 120 Broadway was known as The Equitable Building, it was home to The Bankers’ Club. Opening in 1915, the Bankers Club served as an exclusive private dining facility for celebrities and downtown visitors, playing host to guests such as Queen Elizabeth II and Winston Churchill. World leaders, including several U.S. Presidents, arranged sensitive in-person meetings at the Bankers Club, spurring a citywide trend of office buildings opening members-only facilities to accommodate well-regarded guests.

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